Day: December 1, 2022

Don’t miss these very exciting ASX ETFs in December

A woman is excited as she reads the latest rumour on her phone.

A woman is excited as she reads the latest rumour on her phone.

Are you looking for exchange traded funds (ETFs) to buy in December?

If you are, then you may want to look at the two exciting ETFs that are listed below.

Here’s why they could be worth getting better acquainted with:

BetaShares Asia Technology Tigers ETF (ASX: ASIA)

The first exciting ETF for investors look at this month is the BetaShares Asia Technology Tigers ETF.

This popular ETF gives investors easy access to ~50 of the largest technology companies that have their main area of business in Asia.

Among the tigers that you’ll be owning are well-known tech companies such as Alibaba, Baidu, Infosys, JD.com, Samsung, and Tencent Holdings.

There are also a number of high quality companies that are lesser known outside Asia such as Kuaishou Technology, Meituan Dianping, and Pinduoduo in the fund. The latter is an ecommerce platform that connects distributors with consumers directly through an interactive shopping experience. At the last count, it had an active customer base of approximately 750 million. This makes Kogan.com Ltd (ASX: KGN) and its 3.6 million active customers look like tiny.

Though, one thing to remember with this ETF is that its significant exposure to China means there are regulatory risks to consider. So, this makes it a higher risk option for investors.

BetaShares Global Cybersecurity ETF (ASX: HACK)

Another exciting ETF for ASX investors to consider is the BetaShares Global Cybersecurity ETF.

The recent hacks of Medibank Private Ltd (ASX: MPL) and Optus demonstrate just how important cybersecurity has become for businesses. In light of this, it is no wonder the industry is tipped to grow materially in the future.

This bodes well for the companies included in the HACK ETF, which look well-placed to benefit from increasing investment on cybersecurity.

Among the ETF’s holdings are leading cybersecurity players including Accenture, Cisco, Cloudflare, Crowdstrike, Fortinet, Okta, and Splunk.

The post Don’t miss these very exciting ASX ETFs in December appeared first on The Motley Fool Australia.

Record ETF Surge sees global assets predicted to reach US$18 trillion

Despite recent market volatility, ETFs are seeing a record breaking surge in popularity.

Experts are predicting total global assets could reach an incredible US$18 trillion by 2026. Which means those who find the best ones today, could be setting themselves – and their families – up for tomorrow.

Discover our favourite ETFs we think investors should be buying right now.

Click here to get all the details
*Returns as of November 7 2022

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Motley Fool contributor James Mickleboro has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has positions in and has recommended BetaShares Global Cybersecurity ETF and Kogan.com. The Motley Fool Australia has positions in and has recommended BetaShares Global Cybersecurity ETF and Kogan.com. The Motley Fool Australia has recommended Betashares Capital – Asia Technology Tigers Etf. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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Why did the Lake Resources share price sink in November?

A man in shirt and tie uses his mobile phone under water.A man in shirt and tie uses his mobile phone under water.

The Lake Resources NL (ASX: LKE) share price had a tough run in the month of November.

Lake Resources shares fell 5.66% from $1.06 at market close on 31 October to $1.00 at close on 30 November.

Let’s take a look at how the Lake Resources share price fared during the month.

What happened with Lake Resources?

Lake Resources was not the only ASX lithium share to fall during November. Allkem Ltd (ASX: AKE) shares shed more than 5%, while Core Lithium Ltd (ASX: CXO) shares descended 2%.

Lake shares climbed 11% between market close on 31 October and 14 November before retreating in the second half of the month.

News from the Kachi lithium processing plant on 2 November appeared to provide the Lake Resources share price with the boost. The company’s share price leapt more than 5% on this day. Lake advised initial test work had delivered “at spec” product from the plant.

Commenting on this news, Lake CEO David Dickson said:

We look forward to seeing the test work move into steady state and then for the process to be validated by Hatch so that work on the DFS can be completed.

However, on 8 November, Lake Resources shares fell 2.2% amid short pressure from J Capital. The firm had concerns Lake’s DLE technology won’t work as planned and will “still use large amounts of water and produce toxic waste”.

On 21 November, Lake provided another update from the Kachi project. Lake informed the market it has sorted out a dispute with Lilac Solutions. Lilac provides extraction technology at the project, in Argentina. Dickson said:

We are fortunate to be working with Lilac as our partner, who is equally interested in doing things differently so we can efficiently deliver the large volumes of high-quality lithium chemicals needed by battery makers.

Meanwhile, on 23 November, my Foolish colleague James reported the team at Bell Potter retained a buy rating on the company’s share price with a $2.52 price target. This is more than double the current share price.

On 29 November, Lake held its AGM. Chair Stuart Crown shared optimism about the company’s future. He said:

I look to the coming year with great anticipation and pride as a founding shareholder as your company strives to become one of the world’s significant suppliers of high purity lithium products.

Lake Resources share price snapshot

The Lake Resources share price has surged 18% in the past year, but it has slid 4% in the last week.

For perspective, the ASX 200 has returned 1.64% in the past year.

Lake has a market capitalisation of about $1.4 billion based on its current share price.

The post Why did the Lake Resources share price sink in November? appeared first on The Motley Fool Australia.

Our pullback stock hit list…

Motley Fool Share Advisor has released a hit list of stocks that investors should be paying close attention to right now…

As the market continues to sell off, we think some stocks have become extreme buying opportunities.

In five years’ time, we think you’ll probably wish you bought these 4 ‘pull back’ stocks…

See The 4 Stocks
*Returns as of November 1 2022

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Motley Fool contributor Monica O’Shea has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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This ultra-high-yield ASX dividend share is up 18% in a month. Is it too late to buy?

A woman sits on sofa pondering a question.A woman sits on sofa pondering a question.

The BHP Group Ltd (ASX: BHP) share price has gone on a strong run, rising by around 18% over the last month. The ASX dividend share has done well for shareholders.

It might be a mistake to think that a particular ASX share isn’t worth looking at just because it has risen. Plenty of businesses have gone up and then kept rising in the coming years.

Names like Altium Limited (ASX: ALU) and Pro Medicus Limited (ASX: PME) have seen very strong long-term share price growth, but it would have been a mistake to avoid them five years ago simply because they have risen.

Of course, not every investment is going to turn out as well as those two.

It’s a particularly tricky question for ASX resource shares because of how volatile commodity prices can be.

What’s going on with the BHP share price?

The BHP share price closed on Thursday at $46.48. This is the highest it has been in FY23 to date.

There has been a welcome rise in the iron ore price, which is an important source of profit generation for the ASX dividend share, particularly in the boom times.

During the COVID-19-affected financial years, iron ore generated big money for the company. But, China’s ongoing focus on substantially controlling the spread of COVID-19 infections has meant lockdowns and other restrictions. This has led to a reduction in economic activity and less demand for iron ore.

But, with COVID-zero now seeming to be a very difficult task, there are some investors now thinking that China is getting closer to pivoting away from the strictest policies.

Fewer restrictions could mean more economic activity and more demand for iron ore.

That’s not the only thing that has happened recently. BHP has also offered OZ Minerals Limited (ASX: OZL) enough money for the board to indicate they’d accept the takeover offer. BHP thinks the assets owned by the company, including copper projects, offer attractive long-term synergies for the business.

Is it too late to invest?

Investors are always able to buy BHP shares if they want to — there are plenty of shares on the market.

But, in hindsight, it would have been better to invest a month ago than today. However, in terms of whether today would be a good time to invest, it’s really a question of what resource prices do from here. Higher resource prices can result in higher profit and higher shareholder payments from the ASX dividend share.

But, I think resource prices can only rise so far, meaning the BHP share price can only go up so much sustainably.

Copper could do well in the coming years as the world looks to electrify more parts of society.

Coal earnings may remain elevated for some time if the supply and demand imbalance continues.

The big question is about iron ore. I don’t know if Chinese demand in 2023 will be strong enough to result in the iron ore price being above US$100 for the majority of the year.

I like the commodity mix that BHP has, including the planned potash project in Canada.

I’d rather wait for the BHP share price to slip below $40 again before jumping on the shares. However, even at this higher valuation, the resource giant could pay a grossed-up dividend yield of 9.4% in FY23.

The post This ultra-high-yield ASX dividend share is up 18% in a month. Is it too late to buy? appeared first on The Motley Fool Australia.

Wondering where you should invest $1,000 right now?

When investing expert Scott Phillips has a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the flagship Motley Fool Share Advisor newsletter he has run for over ten years has provided thousands of paying members with stock picks that have doubled, tripled or even more.* Scott just revealed what he believes could be the “five best ASX stocks” for investors to buy right now. These stocks are trading at near dirt-cheap prices and Scott thinks they could be great buys right now

See The 5 Stocks
*Returns as of November 1 2022

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Motley Fool contributor Tristan Harrison has positions in Altium. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has positions in and has recommended Altium and Pro Medicus. The Motley Fool Australia has positions in and has recommended Pro Medicus. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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Why was the Incannex share price put on ice today?

Man with his hand out the front, symbolising a trading halt.Man with his hand out the front, symbolising a trading halt.

The Incannex Healthcare Ltd (ASX: IHL) share price went nowhere on Thursday after the company requested a trading halt before the market open.

The Incannex share price was 23 cents at the close yesterday.

Let’s find out what’s happening with this ASX cannabis share.

Why is the Incannex share price at a standstill?

According to a statement, Incannex intends to conduct a “strategic institutional capital raising“.

Incannex asked the ASX to halt its share trading ahead of an official announcement explaining the detail of the raising.

Incannex shares will remain on ice until the commencement of normal trading on 5 December or upon the release of its announcement.

What’s been happening at Incannex?

Incannex develops medicinal cannabinoid pharmaceutical products.

As my Fool colleague Brooke recently noted, Incannex shares had a shocker in October.

The company entered the S&P/ASX 300 Index (ASX: XKO) in September. The following month, the Incannex share price underperformed the index by 15%. And that was despite a series of seemingly positive market updates.

In November, Incannex shares dropped another 11.5%. Ouch.

Cannabis shares are a highly volatile category of the market. One of their biggest hurdles is regulatory restrictions.

Medicinal cannabis is simply not legal in many parts of the world — including numerous states in the enormous nascent United States market.

As my Fool colleague Bernd reports, US President Joe Biden wants marijuana use legalised.

In October, he announced he would pardon everyone convicted of simple possession.

ASX cannabis shares responded to that, with Incannex shares rising 11% over two days.

Incannex performance snapshot

Incannex shares are down 65% in the year to date.

Over the past five years, they are up 1,050%.

The post Why was the Incannex share price put on ice today? appeared first on The Motley Fool Australia.

Wondering where you should invest $1,000 right now?

When investing expert Scott Phillips has a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the flagship Motley Fool Share Advisor newsletter he has run for over ten years has provided thousands of paying members with stock picks that have doubled, tripled or even more.* Scott just revealed what he believes could be the “five best ASX stocks” for investors to buy right now. These stocks are trading at near dirt-cheap prices and Scott thinks they could be great buys right now

See The 5 Stocks
*Returns as of November 1 2022

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Motley Fool contributor Bronwyn Allen has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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