How much have REA shares paid in dividends in the last 5 years

a small boy dressed in a bow tie and britches looks up from a pile of books with a book laid in front of him on a desk and an abacus on the other side, as though he is an accountant scouring books of figures.a small boy dressed in a bow tie and britches looks up from a pile of books with a book laid in front of him on a desk and an abacus on the other side, as though he is an accountant scouring books of figures.

What a crazy 2022 it has been for the REA Group Ltd (ASX: REA) share price.

Despite surging over the medium-term, the property listings company’s shares are down 28% for the calendar year to date.

This is being driven by extreme inflationary movements and aggressive rate hikes which have sparked concerns among investors.

Over the same time frame, the S&P/ASX 200 Index (ASX: XJO) has also tumbled by around 10%.

Although there’s been recent share price weakness, let’s take a look at how much REA has paid in dividends since 2017?

What’s REA dividend history?

Notwithstanding COVID-19, the REA board has continued to increase its fully-franked dividends to shareholders for more than a decade. 

Below, we take a look at the past five years’ worth of dividends that the company has distributed.

  • September 2017 – 51 cents (final)
  • March 2018 – 47 cents (interim)
  • September 2018 – 62 cents (final)
  • March 2019 – 55 cents (interim)
  • September 2019 – 63 cents (final)
  • March 2020 – 55 cents (interim)
  • September 2020 – 55 cents (final)
  • March 2021 – 59 cents (interim)
  • September 2021 – 72 cents (final)
  • March 2022 – 75 cents (interim)

Calculating the above REA dividends since September 2017 gives us a total figure of $5.94 for every share owned.

While it might seem modest compared to the current share price, a $10,000 investment in 2017 would have reaped around $8,500 in profits today, including the dividends.

REA share price snapshot

Over the last 12 months, the REA share price has lost around 26%.

The company’s shares climbed throughout 2021 before reversing their gains from January 2022 onwards.

In terms of market capitalisation, REA is the largest property and property-related services group on the ASX, valued at approximately $15.97 billion.

At the time of writing, REA shares are swapping hands at $120.72, up 0.97%.

The company has a dividend yield of 1.23%.

The post How much have REA shares paid in dividends in the last 5 years appeared first on The Motley Fool Australia.

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*Returns as of July 1 2022

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Motley Fool contributor Aaron Teboneras has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia has recommended REA Group Limited. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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