I think the Betashares Nasdaq 100 ETF looks like a strong buy

a man sits at a computer in deep thought with hand on chin in a darkened room as though it is late and night and he is working on cybersecurity issues.

a man sits at a computer in deep thought with hand on chin in a darkened room as though it is late and night and he is working on cybersecurity issues.This could prove to be a good time to invest in the Betashares Nasdaq 100 ETF (ASX: NDQ).

It has been a rough period since the start of 2022. The NDQ exchange traded fund (ETF) has dropped by around 25% in that time.

But, an ETF’s performance simply reflects the movements of its underlying holdings.

The Betashares Nasdaq 100 ETF tracks the performance of the NASDAQ 100 Index, which is made up of 100 of the largest non-financial businesses listed on the NASDAQ.

The provider of the ETF, BetaShares, notes that many of the companies in this portfolio are at the forefront of the ‘new economy’.

What are some of the names in the portfolio?

At 15 July 2022, these were the biggest positions: Apple, Microsoft, Alphabet, Amazon.com, Tesla, Meta Platforms, Nvidia, PepsiCo, and Costco.

As readers may recognise, these are some of the leading businesses in the world at what they do. It can be hard to dislodge a business when it has such a strong competitive position.

Think how many tens of billions of dollars a business might need to spend just to have a chance of competing with Apple’s iPhone or Alphabet’s Google.

For me, it’s the quality nature of the underlying businesses that makes the Betashares Nasdaq 100 ETF so attractive to me. Just look at the returns of the NDQ ETF over the five years to 30 June 2022. It achieved an average return per annum of 18.2% despite the recent decline.

Valuation change

The collective group of businesses in the NASDAQ 100 has dropped by around 25% in valuation amid worries about inflation and interest rate changes.

As an investor, I want to invest in good businesses at good prices. Being able to buy all these great businesses at a price that’s 25% cheaper than 2021 looks good to me.

According to BetaShares, at 30 June 2022, the forward price/earnings (p/e) ratio was just under 20 at 30 June 2022. While this isn’t exactly low, I think it’s a worthwhile price to pay considering the long-term growth potential for plenty of the underlying businesses.

Useful diversification for a reasonable price

There are more than just the major holdings in the portfolio. Names like Adobe, PayPal, Cisco Systems, Qualcomm, Intuitive Surgical, Booking, and ASML each have a compelling case to make.

The NDQ ETF can provide diversification for investors who are largely invested in ASX shares, with the S&P/ASX 200 Index (ASX: XJO) being dominated by financial shares and resource shares. The NASDAQ 100 is largely about tech shares, with a 50% weighting to IT.

It’s worth bearing in mind that some of the names that readers may think are ‘technology’ are actually classified as something else. For example, Tesla and Amazon are counted as consumer discretionary businesses, while Alphabet and Meta Platforms are classified as communication services.

The annual management fee is 0.48%.

The post I think the Betashares Nasdaq 100 ETF looks like a strong buy appeared first on The Motley Fool Australia.

Should you invest $1,000 in Betashares Nasdaq 100 Etf right now?

Before you consider Betashares Nasdaq 100 Etf, you’ll want to hear this.

Motley Fool Investing expert Scott Phillips just revealed what he believes are the 5 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Betashares Nasdaq 100 Etf wasn’t one of them.

The online investing service he’s run for over a decade, Motley Fool Share Advisor, has provided thousands of paying members with stock picks that have doubled, tripled or even more.* And right now, Scott thinks there are 5 stocks that are better buys.

See The 5 Stocks
*Returns as of July 7 2022

(function() {
function setButtonColorDefaults(param, property, defaultValue) {
if( !param || !param.includes(‘#’)) {
var button = document.getElementsByClassName(“pitch-snippet”)[0].getElementsByClassName(“pitch-button”)[0];
button.style[property] = defaultValue;
}
}

setButtonColorDefaults(“#0095C8”, ‘background’, ‘#5FA85D’);
setButtonColorDefaults(“#0095C8”, ‘border-color’, ‘#43A24A’);
setButtonColorDefaults(“#fff”, ‘color’, ‘#fff’);
})()

More reading

Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Motley Fool contributor Tristan Harrison has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has positions in and has recommended Adobe Inc., Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, Apple, BETANASDAQ ETF UNITS, Booking Holdings, Cisco Systems, Costco Wholesale, Intuit, Microsoft, Nvidia, PayPal Holdings, Qualcomm, and Tesla. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has recommended the following options: long January 2024 $420 calls on Adobe Inc., long March 2023 $120 calls on Apple, short January 2024 $430 calls on Adobe Inc., and short March 2023 $130 calls on Apple. The Motley Fool Australia has positions in and has recommended BETANASDAQ ETF UNITS. The Motley Fool Australia has recommended Adobe Inc., Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, Apple, Booking Holdings, Nvidia, and PayPal Holdings. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

from The Motley Fool Australia https://ift.tt/2EcRmVD

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s