Bought $1,000 of Woolworths shares 10 years ago? Here’s how much dividend income you’ve received

Happy woman looking for groceries. as she watches the Coles share price and Woolworths share price on her phoneHappy woman looking for groceries. as she watches the Coles share price and Woolworths share price on her phone

Those who have held Woolworths Group Ltd (ASX: WOW) shares over the past decade have likely been pretty chuffed with their investment.

The Woolworths share price has gained 37% over the last 10 years. If an investor bought $1,000 of Woolies stock in December 2012, they likely would have walked away with 40 shares, paying $24.97 apiece.

Today, 40 Woolworths shares would be worth $1,372.40. Stock in the supermarket operator is currently trading at $34.31 per share.

However, the S&P/ASX 200 Index (ASX: XJO) has lifted around 56% over the same period, leaving the Woolworths share price’s performance in its dust.

But have the supermarket giant’s dividends levelled the playing field? Let’s take a look.

How much have Woolworths shares paid in dividends in 10 years?

Here are all the dividends Woolworths has offered over the decade just been:

Westpac dividends’ pay date Type Dividend amount
September 2022 Final 53 cents
April 2022 Interim 39 cents
October 2021 Final 55 cents
April 2021 Interim 53 cents
October 2020 Final 48 cents
April 2020 Interim 46 cents
September 2019 Final 57 cents
April 2019 Interim 45 cents
October 2018 Final 50 cents
October 2018 Special 10 cents
April 2018 Interim 43 cents
October 2017 Final 50 cents
April 2017 Interim 34 cents
October 2016 Final 33 cents
April 2016 Interim 44 cents
October 2015 Final 72 cents
April 2015 Interim 67 cents
October 2014 Final 72 cents
April 2014 Interim 65 cents
October 2013 Final 71 cents
April 2013 Interim 62 cents
Total:   $10.69

As the above chart shows, Woolworths shares have paid out $10.69 per share in dividends over the last 10 years.

That means someone holding 40 stocks in the ASX 200 supermarket operator likely would have received $427.60 of dividends in that time.

Thus, our figurative $1,000 investment a decade ago has yielded $372.40 in capital gains and $427.60 in passive income – a total of $800. That leaves Woolworths shares boasting an 80% return in that time.

And that’s before considering franking credits. All Woolies dividends in that time have been fully franked, potentially bringing additional benefits at tax time.

Finally, a savvy investor who reinvested their dividends, potentially through the company’s dividend investment plan (DRP), likely would have realised an even larger gain through the magic of compounding.

Woolworths shares are currently trading with a 2.68% trailing dividend yield.

The post Bought $1,000 of Woolworths shares 10 years ago? Here’s how much dividend income you’ve received appeared first on The Motley Fool Australia.

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Motley Fool contributor Brooke Cooper has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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