Did you buy $1,000 of Bank of Queensland shares 10 years ago? Here’s how much dividend income you’ve made

A man with a wry smile on his face is shown close up behind ascending piles of coins as he places another coin on top of the tallest stack representing rising dividendsA man with a wry smile on his face is shown close up behind ascending piles of coins as he places another coin on top of the tallest stack representing rising dividends

The Bank of Queensland Ltd (ASX: BOQ) share price has struggled to keep up with the S&P/ASX 200 Index (ASX: XJO) over the last decade.

$1,000 likely would have bought 123 Bank of Queensland shares in January 2013. Then, the bank’s stock was trading at around $8.10.

Today, the Bank of Queensland share price is around 14% lower at $6.93, leaving our figurative parcel valued at just $852.39.

For comparison, the ASX 200 has gained nearly 55% over the last decade.

But have the dividends on offer from Bank of Queensland made up for its share price’s sluggishness? Let’s take a look.

All the dividends offered by Bank of Queensland shares since 2013

Here are all the payments the Queensland-based bank has offered shareholders over the last 10 years:

BOQ dividends’ pay date Type Dividend amount
November 2022 Final 24 cents
May 2022 Interim 22 cents
November 2021 Final 22 cents
May 2021 Interim 17 cents
November 2020 Final 12 cents
November 2019 Final 31 cents
May 2019 Interim 34 cents
November 2018 Final 38 cents
May 2018 Interim 38 cents
November 2017 Final and special 46 cents and 8 cents
May 2017 Interim 38 cents
November 2016 Final 38 cents
May 2016 Interim 38 cents
November 2015 Final 38 cents
May 2015 Interim 36 cents
November 2014 Final 34 cents
May 2014 Interim 32 cents
December 2013 Final 30 cents
May 2013 Interim 28 cents
Total:   $6.04

As the chart above shows, those invested in the bank’s shares have likely received $6.04 per stock in dividends since early 2013.

That means our figurative parcel probably yielded $742.92 – enough to boost its returns back into the green. 

Considering both share price movements and dividends, the stock boasts a 10-year return on investment (ROI) of 60%.

And that’s before considering any additional benefits investors may have received from franking credits. All the bank’s offerings during that time were fully franked.

Bank of Queensland shares currently offer a notable 6.6% dividend yield.

The post Did you buy $1,000 of Bank of Queensland shares 10 years ago? Here’s how much dividend income you’ve made appeared first on The Motley Fool Australia.

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Motley Fool contributor Brooke Cooper has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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